Green Room Review

Caleb Thompson, Author

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






DISCLAIMER: Green Room is rated R for strong brutal graphic violence, gory images, language, and some drug use.

Following the members of “Ain’t Right”, a metal band, played by Anton Yelchin, Alia Shawkat, Joe Cole, Callum Turner respectively, 2015’s Green Room tells an intense game of cat and mouse.  After they witness a murder, the members of “Ain’t Right”, along with a woman named Amber, played by Imogen Poots, are locked in the green room of a bar by its owner, Darcy, played by Patrick Stewart.

As the movie progresses, the game evolves both the band and Darcy gain and lose power.  Such shifts in the story keep the audience guessing, something many horror movies fail to do.  This is one of Green Room’s greatest strengths, it’s unpredictability.  This constant feeling of being unsure what is going to happens helps to keep the movie’s momentum and tension all throughout.  It also drives the movie’s horrific moments.  This is not done through cheap jump scares, but by the feeling of the unknown, the suspense. Green Room is not so much a scary movie as it is suspenseful and gruesome.

Green Room’s gore is spectacular.  It is always handled in a realistic way.  It never feels over the top, or unnecessary.  It simply enhances the realism of the film, adding to the suspenseful nature of it.  It also works in tandem with the unpredictable nature of the film.  Both the unpredictability and the gore of the film enter at the same time.  And you cannot have one without the other.  The gore sets up the stakes of the unpredictable.  You never know when the next horribly violent act will occur, and that’s what keeps you on the edge of your seat all throughout Green Room.  Another strength of the movie is it’s cast.

Both the late Anton Yelchin and Patrick Stewart shine in their roles respectively.  Anton plays the part of the realistically and understandably cowardly Pat, “Ain’t Right’s” bass player.  His demeanor captures the desperation and disbelief of his character, elevating the realistic feel of the film.  On the other hand, Patrick Steward is terrifying, and rightfully so.  His performance as a hardened criminal is nightmarish.  He is not a cartoonish villain.  He is very real.  He thinks things through, plots mechanically, like an evil mastermind.  However, he does all this without coming across as cartoonish, helping to further elevate the realism of the film.

Overall, I would recommend Green Room to fans of thrillers, home invasion horror films, or those with a taste for a realistic aesthetic in their horror.  Green Room can currently be streamed through Amazon Prime’s video service.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

We welcome your feedback!

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Green Room Review

    Culture

    “I Scream, You Scream” A Short Story

  • Green Room Review

    Prep Life

    Exchange Student Interviews

  • Green Room Review

    Prep Life

    How to Stay (Mostly) Sane During Finals Week

  • Green Room Review

    Prep Life

    Living the Prep Legacy

  • News

    The World Series: In a Nutshell

  • Green Room Review

    Prep Life

    12th Annual Choral Connections Review

  • Green Room Review

    Culture

    Happy Death Day (2017) Review

  • Green Room Review

    Prep Life

    Update From The Students In Austria

  • Green Room Review

    Prep Life

    Homecoming Review

  • Green Room Review

    Culture

    No More Uber in London?

Green Room Review